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Important Dates
May 2 - May 27 - SBAC testing
 - May 3 and 4 - English Language Arts
 - May 17 and 18 - Math
 - May 24 and 25 - Math Performance Task
May 18 - Spring Concert, 7:00
May 20 - Field day
May 25 - Picture orders due (optional)
May 27 - Early dismissal
May 30 - No School - Memorial Day
June 7 - Sturbridge trip, tentative
June 9 - DARE graduation, 6:30
June 15 - Tentative Last Day of School
DARE Essay
*Your final essay (Due May 31st, must be typed and printed out). 
*Minimum of 1 typed page. Maximum of 3 typed pages.
*Use a 12 or 14 point font. Select a font that is clear and easy to read. 
*Use black ink only. 
*You may include a colorful title page that includes an image, but no images should be placed within your essay.
*Write about 2 to 3 DARE topics (see page 23).
*You may write a standard informational essay or show what you've learned through a creative narrative piece.  
*Proofreading your work with an adult will help you edit and revise carefully. 
May 2, 2016
Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Testing - Students will begin SBAC testing May 2, with the test spread out over the month.  You can support your children in this assessment by arriving to school on time, having a nutritious breakfast and snack and making sure good bedtimes are followed.  For more information, visit SBAC's website and to see a practice test, visit the SBAC portal.  

 
Language Arts - Our reading is a focused on fantasy as a genre. We are reading The Thief of Always by Clive Barker, delving into the world that Barker creates in The Holiday House and the quest our hero, Harvey, takes.  Students are reading a number of fantasy books in book clubs, as well.
On the writing side of the unit, students are writing literary essays, an extension of our opinion writing unit.  The literary essay asks students to stake a claim about a text and support that claim with well-reasoned evidence from the text(s)
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3
Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5
Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6
Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7
Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.9
Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.B
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.C
Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrastespecially).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.E
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
Math - We studied geometry, focused on how to classify and categorize shapes, and then to measure volume.  We are returning to our fraction study, learning to divide fractions.  
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.G.B.3
Understand that attributes belonging to a category of two-dimensional figures also belong to all subcategories of that category. For example, all rectangles have four right angles and squares are rectangles, so all squares have four right angles.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.G.B.4
Classify two-dimensional figures in a hierarchy based on properties.
Social Studies - We closely examined the causes of the Revolution and are focused on the outcomes of the Revolution.  We are taking a careful look at the documents our country was founded on - the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, connecting the principles outlined in these documents to the early experiences of the colonists.
Science - DARE with Officer Tony Gonzalez continues, and will continue for remainder of the school year on Tuesdays. For more information on DARE, please see www.dare.org Please also note that DARE graduation will be Thursday, June 9 at 6:30.
We begin health May 2nd, studying the changes male and female bodies go through during puberty.  Keep an eye on your children's backpacks for the "I Learned" sheets that will give you insight into the lessons and your child's thoughts.
 Please let me know if you have any questions.
Important Dates
April 11 - April 15 No School - Spring Break
April 27 - May 27 - SBAC testing
May 18 - Spring Concert, 7:00
May 27 - Early dismissal
May 30 - No School - Memorial Day
June 7 - Sturbidge trip, tentative
June 9 - DARE graduation, 6:30
June 15 - Tentative Last Day of School
April 4, 2016
Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Testing - Students will be participating in SBAC testing after Spring Break.  We have been preparing for the test in class, making sure stduents are familiar with the format and tools.  We have also been reviewing our math skills to prepare.  One way students can prepare at home is to practice their math facts.  For more information, visit SBAC's website and to see a practice test, visit the SBAC portal.  


 
Language Arts - Our next unit in reading is a study of fantasy as a genre. We will be analyzing The Lightning Thief to see how authors develop a world for fantasy and then create a compelling story for the characters within this world. 
On the writing side of the unit, students will extend their opinion writing skills to writing literary essays.  The literary essay is an opportunity for students to analyze a text or across texts to prove their stance on the story.  We will be drawing on the skills we learned in out opinion writing to write literary essays.
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3
Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5
Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6
Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7
Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.9
Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.B
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.C
Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrastespecially).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.E
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
Math - We are moving ahead in the sequence of units in Go Math to the last chapter on volume.  Students will examine properties of shapes, reviewing perimeter and area.  We will then learn ways to compute volume.  The unit has a great deal of vocabulary.  Please note students have access to the Go Math videos every day to understand and review the concepts taught in class.
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.G.B.3
Understand that attributes belonging to a category of two-dimensional figures also belong to all subcategories of that category. For example, all rectangles have four right angles and squares are rectangles, so all squares have four right angles.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.G.B.4
Classify two-dimensional figures in a hierarchy based on properties.
Social Studies - We have moved on to the Revolutionary War.  we are working to understand the events that united the colonists and the conqsequences of events such as The Continental Congress and Declarartion of Independence.   
Science - DARE with Officer Tony Gonzalez continues, and will continue for remainder of the school year on Tuesdays. For more information on DARE, please see www.dare.org Please also note that DARE graduation will be Thursday, June 9 at 6:30.
We will begin health, studying the changes male and female bodies go through during puberty, after vacation. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Important Dates
February 12 - February 16 No School - Winter recess
February 18 - Special Person's Day 8:05-10:35
February 23 - ** Springfield Museum Field Trip **
Feb 29 - March 4 Jump Rope for Heart
March 25 - No School - Good Friday
April 11 - April 15 No School - Spring Break
May 30 - No School - Memorial Day
June 13 - Tentative Last Day of School

Important Dates
March 15, 2016 - Science CMT
March 22 and 23 - early dismissal - conferences
March 25 - No School - Good Friday
April 11 - April 15 No School - Spring Break
April 27 - May 27 - SBAC testing
May 27 - Early dismissal
May 30 - No School - Memorial Day
June 7 - Sturbidge trip, tentative
June 9 - DARE graduation, 6:30
June 15 - Tentative Last Day of School
March 9, 2016

Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Testing - Students will be participating in a variety of tests in the coming weeks.  Scince CMT will occur on Tuesday, March 15.  This is a paper test that has multiple choice and open ended question student science understanding from 3rd, 4th and 5th grades.  Students will also prepare for SBAC testing that will begin after Spring Break.  This is a computer-based test and we will be working on a number of practice tests to ensure students are familiar with the format and test-typ questions.  For more information, visit SBAC's website and to see a practice test, visit the SBAC portal.  


 
Language Arts - We continue our unit of advocacy and argument. Students continue to learn and implement various ways to effectively collect information on topics of interest and read opinion pieces with a critical stance. 
On the writing side of the unit, we continue to develop our claims on chocolate milk in schools.  Students are working to develop strong evidence to support their claim and organize their writing to improve their arguments.
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3
Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.4
Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5
Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6
Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7
Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.8
Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.9
Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.10
By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.B
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.C
Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrastespecially).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.E
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
Math - We finished our unit on adding and subtracting decimals. We will be working on multiplying and dividing decimals and then move on to geometry. As with our previous units, students will learn conceptual uderstanding of operations with decimals such as why multiplying decimals can result in numbers of less value than the terms and dividing can result in number fo greater value than the terms. Continue to check our homework page for links of the daily lesson and videos explaining our learning. 
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:

Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NF.A.1
Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. For example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NF.A.2
Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers. For example, recognize an incorrect result 2/5 + 1/2 = 3/7, by observing that 3/7 < 1/2.
Social Studies - We finished our study on the early colonies and are moving on to the Revolutionary War. We will examine the events leading up to the Declaration of Independence. We will look at the people who prompted the Revolution and events such as the Boston Tea Party. 
Science - We are preparing for the Science CMT that the students will take on March 15. Students participated in Catch It!, an inquiry in which students test their reaction time and develop testable questions.  DARE with Officer Tony Gonzalez began March 8th for us, and will continue for remainder of the school year on Tuesdays. For more information on DARE, please see www.dare.org Please also note that DARE graduation will be Thursday, June 9 at 6:30.

Important Dates
February 12 - February 16 No School - Winter recess
February 18 - Special Person's Day 8:05-10:35
February 23 - ** Springfield Museum Field Trip **
Feb 29 - March 4 Jump Rope for Heart
March 25 - No School - Good Friday
April 11 - April 15 No School - Spring Break
May 30 - No School - Memorial Day
June 13 - Tentative Last Day of School
February 8, 2016
Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Language Arts - We have begun a fun unit of advocacy and argument. On the reading side of the unit, students are reading nonfiction to gather information about issues worth discussing such as should people use plastic bags, should people be allowed to climb Mt. Everest and should we protect people from sharks or sharks from people. Throughout the unit, we will focus as a class on the issue of chocolate milk in schools, using this topic as a springboard for critical reading and research skills. We will work on ways to collect information, critical reading for both sides of an argument and deeply researching a topic. In a world where we are bombarded with claims, the skills of weighing and analyzing evidecne to form educated opinions is a vital skill for students.

On the writing side of the unit, we will apply our reading work through constructing strong arguments with evidence to support our claims. We will write essays either for or against the sale of choclate milk in schools. We will read widely on the topic, as well as view news clips, to gather research to support our claims on the topic and work to construct our arguments using this evidence in a convincing, compelling argument. Our focus is on developing a claim (thesis) and using strong, sound evidence to support the claim.
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.1
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3
Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.4
Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5
Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6
Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7
Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.8
Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.9
Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.10
By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.B
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.C
Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrastespecially).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.E
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
Math - Our first unit in Go Math was on decimals, and covered chapters 1-5. We move on to our next unit of fractions. The first chapter focuses on adding and subtracting fractions, including fractions with unlike denominators. We begin by using fraction bars to understand why unlike denominators must be converted to common multiples. As students master this conceptual understanding, we move on to procedures to convert to equivalent fractions to efficiently add and subtract. We discuss different ways to say the same quantity, including mixed numbers and improper fractions. Go Math continues to place an emphasis on problem solving using the skills within the unit.
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:

Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NF.A.1
Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. For example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NF.A.2
Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers. For example, recognize an incorrect result 2/5 + 1/2 = 3/7, by observing that 3/7 < 1/2.
Social Studies - After looking at the settlers and issues facing the middle colonies, we are studying the southern colonies. We will compare and contrast life in the southern colonies ad sprawling plantations to that of northern colonies. We move on next to civil unrest and the issues that led to revolution, focusing on the ideals that the settlers held and the people that made the revolution possible. As the revolution ends, we will examine the birth of the nation, including the struggles to create a democratic government that would unite the wide variety of peoples in the land. 
Science - My class finishes their unit with Mr. Setaro, studying sound. They are working hard on their instrument project as they wrap up the unit. Mrs. Mahoney's class works with me on CMT review, practicing CMT-like questions and reviewing the science concepts that might appear on the test.  
DARE with Officer Tony Gonzalez begins in March for us, on Tuesdays, and will continue for remainder of the school year. For more information on DARE, please see www.dare.org 

Important Dates
January 4 School resumes
January 18 No School - Martin Luther King Jr. Day
January 25 Parent Health Informational Meeting - 7:00 SDMS
February 2 - Field Trip permission slip due
February 4 - 100th Day of School (without snow days)
February 9 - Special Person's Day 8:30-11:00
February 12 - February 16 No School - Winter recess
February 23 - ** Springfield Museum Field Trip **
Feb 29 - March 4 Jump Rope for Heart
March 25 - No School - Good Friday
April 11 - April 15 No School - Spring Break
May 30 - No School - Memorial Day
June 13 - Tentative Last Day of School

January 4, 2016
Happy New Year!
Minute to Win It Fun
Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Language Arts - Our next unit is a study of historical fiction in book clubs. We used the book club format with our non-fiction unit, but from the perspective that each member chose books at their reading level around a topic that interested the whole group. With fiction-reading book clubs, students will choose books at their reading level in their group to explore together and read at the same time. The group decides their own reading goals, within a timeframe, discussion topics and guides their work, much like adult book clubs do. (Students' biggest complaint durring this unit is whe group members don't do their work on time!)
As a class in October, we read Into the Firestorm: A Novel of San Francisco, 1906 by Deborah Hopkinson and explored how authors blend fact-telling with storytelling in historical fiction. We will revisit this text throughout the unit, as well as read The Sacrifice by Kathleen Benner Duble, a historical fiction novel that picks up on our work with the Salem Witch Trial in social studies, a topic of high interest for the class. 
To complement this reading work, we will be working on opinion writing. We will use the five-paragraph essay structure, creating an introduction with a thesis statement, strong supporting reasons developed in the body of the essay and a conclusion. Our research skills will be used to support the claims that we make and the defend them with strong reasoning. Students will also be introduced to the literary essay - the use of opinion writing to explore one or more texts and support your ideas with evidence. It follows the same structures as opinion writing, but focuses on developing our thoughts as critical readers and being able to defend those thoughts with strong evidence from the text. 
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.1
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.3
Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9
Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.10
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.A
Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer's purpose.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.B
Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.C
Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently,specifically).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.D
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
Minute to Win It Fun
Math - The fourth unit in Go Math! that we are working on is multiplying decimals.  This will be followed by dividing decimals.  Our lessons show students why working with decimals results in products or quotients larger or smaller than your original numbers.  The program also places an emphasis on showing the students multiple ways to solve the same problem, acknowledging that each student may think in each way to reason out math solutions.  The goal is for each student to have at least one method that is reliable and efficient. Students continue to have access to all of our demonstration videos on thinkcentral.com. 
Connections to Career and College Readiness Standards:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NBT.A.1
Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NBT.A.3.A
Read and write decimals to thousandths using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form, e.g., 347.392 = 3 × 100 + 4 × 10 + 7 × 1 + 3 × (1/10) + 9 × (1/100) + 2 × (1/1000).
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NBT.B.7
Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.

Minute to Win It Fun

Social Studies - We took a quiz on the New England colonies just before vacation. We discussed the differences between Separatists (The Pilgrims) and Puritans and how Puritan values largely shaped the settling of the New England colonies. We will examine the Middle Colonies and Southern colonies in the coming month, moving towards civil unrest with England and the causes of the Revolution. As we look at the colonies, we continue to emphasize the values and ideals of the people settling the lands, looking forward to how those values will influence and shape the founding documents of the country.
Minute to Win It FunMinute to Win It Fun
Science - My class continues to work with Mrs. Mahoney to study properties of light and how the eye processes images.  It is important for students to maintain their science notebook and to remember all their materials, including homework, when traveling between classes.  Mr. Setaro's class continues to work with me to review science concepts that will be tested on the CMT in March.  In mid-January, we will switch classes one more time, my class will go to Mr. Setaro for a study of the properties of sound and how the ear processes sounds and I will have Mrs. Mahoney's class for the CMT review.  
PLEASE NOTE: There is an informational parent meeting on the upcoming health unit (puberty) on Monday, January 25th at 7:00 at SDMS.  We will review the content of the course and give parents an opportunity to ask questions.  I am always available to answer any questions or address any concerns you may have.  Depending on our DARE schedule, we anticipate the health unit occuring in May with each classroom teacher teaching his/her own class.  

Minute to Win It FunMinute to Win It Fun




Important Dates
Dec. 7-11 Book fair
Dec. 10 Concert day
 9:00-10:10 Grades 4-6
 10:40-11:30 Grades K-3
 12:00-1:10 Grades 4-6
 1:40-2:30 Grades K-3
 ** Please plan to visit the book fair while you are here **
Dec. 12 Holiday shop
Dec. 14 Cyberbullying presentation with WPD
 Report cards go home
Dec. 23 Early dismissal
Dec. 24-Jan. 3 Winter recess

 

December 1, 2015

One way that Charles Wright School and WPS is working to prepare students for success is to utilize the College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards.  At the high school level, it is easy to make correlations for how students are being prepared for college and career, but those connections can sometimes be harder to see at the elementary level.  The CCRA Standards help give language to how those standards are being addressed through the fifth grade curriculum.  You will find these connections listed at you read through the Curriculum Happenings below and throughout the rest of the year.  To read all of the standards, please visit corestandards.org.

Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Language Arts - We continue our nonfiction unit as we have moved into research book clubs.  Students chose topics of high interest and were grouped in pairs, threesomes and groups based on those interests.  The teams developed research questions to guide their reading on their topics, ranging from the Titanic to pets to the unexplained.  Over the coming weeks, we will focus on meeting our own goals and creating share books that inform on our chosen topics. 
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.1
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.7
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.10
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
Math - Our third unit is on naming, adding and subtracting decimals. We examine ways to model decimals with base-ten blocks and use our models to add and subtract the decimals represented, leading to an understanding of why the procedure of lining up the decimal place to perform these operations works mathematically. This work leads into our next unit of multiplying decimals where we will continue to use models to understand why procedures work to multiply decimals and whole numbers together. Students continue to have access to all of our demonstration videos on thinkcentral.com. 
Social Studies - We completed our first test on explorers and the first colonies at Roanoke, Jamestown and Plymouth.  We will continue to study the early colonies and the challenges the settlers faced, including hunger, faulty shelters, hostiles natives and harsh weather conditions.  Despite these setbacks, the settlers persevered and prospered, developing settlements and then cities.  We will examine the factors that led to success and then unrest with England, leading up to the American Revolution.
Science - We are finishing our review of previous science concepts and will begin switching classes.  My students will go to Mrs. Mahoney's class to learn about light and how the eye processes light waves.  Students will be learning about light waves, concepts of reflection and refraction, the parts of the eye and how the parts work together to process sight and color.  Mr. Setaro's class will be joining Mrs. Antonelli to review grades 3 and 4 science concepts for CMT preparation.

Important Dates

October 28-November 16 - Grade 5 Thanksgiving Food Drive

** PICTURE RETAKES MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16 **

Oct. 27 Mix It Up Day
Nov. 3 NO SCHOOL Election Day
Nov. 11 NO SCHOOL Veteran's Day
Nov. 14-15 UConn Children's Book Fair, Storrs (bookfair.uconn.edu)
Nov. 17 Lyman order pick-ups
Nov. 25 Town meeting; Early Dismissal
Nov. 26-27 Thanksgiving recess
Dec. 10 Concert day
Dec. 12 Holiday shop
Dec. 23 Early dismissal

Dec. 24-Jan. 3 Winter recess

November 6, 2015

One area we have been working hard on in class is goal-setting. We have had morning meeting discussions about how we are always setting short- and long-term goals for ourselves and how we must take ownership of whether we achieve those goals or if they fall by the wayside. We talked about how teachers will help students develop habits to achieve goals, but ultimately it is up to each of us as individuals to make our goals happen. 
We have been setting goals in a number of ways. We set reading goals based on what our individual strengths and weaknesses were in October. We have also looked at our basic fact performance and set goals for our December timed tests. Some strategies we identified to help us meet that goal are:
1. practice Xtramath every day
2. review flash cards with a partner
3. write our unknown facts repeatedly (maybe 100 times)
We also journaled about our short-term fifth grade goals and our long-term life goals, thinking about some of the habits we might need to develop to meet those goals.
Take a minute to talk with your child about his/her goals and ways s/he can meet them! 


October 26, 2015

Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Language Arts - We are moving on to our first nonfiction unit in reading. In this unit, we will look at ways nonfiction is structured to support the reader's learning. This compliments our work in writing where we are working on write our own nonfiction to teach others, using structure to help the reader learn. 
Math - Our second unit is on dividing whole numbers. We reviewed long division, work begun in fourth grade. We are modeling division using base-ten blocks, learning various strategies from traditional long division to partial quotients, recognizing that there are multiple reliable ways to solve division problems.
Social Studies - We are conitnuing our study of explorers through our nonfiction study. We are looking at research questions through study of reasons explorers left their known world for uncharted territories or the Native American cultures that the explorers encountered that lived in North and South America already.
Science - We continue our review of the concepts the students studied in previous years including the rocks and minerals and properties of matter. We will continue to review concepts from grades three-four to prepare for the science CMT the students will take in March. We have been practicing ways to approach test questions thoughtfully and to use the test to our advantage when presented with tricky questions.


         





Important Dates

Oct. 8 Picture day
Oct. 9 Book orders due 
 Leif Eriksson day
Oct. 12 NO SCHOOL Columbus Day
Oct. 15 Family Math Night 6:30-8:00
Oct. 15 Lyman Orders due
Oct. 16 Jog-a-thon (boys blue, girls purple)
Oct. 20 Early dismissal - Conferences
Oct. 21 Early dismissal - Conferences
Oct. 22 Early dismissal - Conferences
Nov. 17 Lyman order pick-ups
Nov. 3 NO SCHOOL Election Day
Nov. 11 NO SCHOOL Veteran's Day

September 30, 2015

Curriculum Happenings in Fifth Grade
Language Arts - We are working on our launch unit in reading. In this unit, we are looking at characters and setting in stories to see how authors use both to build meaning. We are also practicing components of good reading responses. This compliments our work in writing where we are working on personal narrative. We are telling stories about ourselves that have meaning and significance in a way that captures the reader's attention.
Our next unit will be informational reading with a focus on historical fiction.

Math - Our first unit has focused on writing numbers in a variety of ways, reviewing multiplication and division and problem solving. We have been using math vocabulary in our math notebooks to help us understand the concepts.
Social Studies - The first unit of study for the year is explorers. We studied a number of European explorers and what they found as they looked for a trade route to India and the Far East. We will be moving into small projects on the explorers to tie into our informational reading unit.
Science - We have been reviewing a number of the concepts the students studied in previous years including the moon, water, and rocks and minerals. We will continue to review concepts from grades three-four to prepare for the science CMT the students will take in March.


September 17, 2015

Scholastic Reading Club - Class code MCJRR

Parent Open House Power Point 

August 31, 2015

Important Dates
Sept 4  Spirit Day - Wear Red & White
            CW Family Picnic 5:30-7:30
Sept 7  NO SCHOOL Labor Day
Sept 7 - 11  Penny Wars!!
Sept 17  Open House 6:30-7:30

Mark your calendars!  

OPEN HOUSE - Thursday, September 17 at 6:30

August 24, 2015

Welcome to Fifth Grade!!

Our specials schedule:
A - PE
B - Art
C - Chorus
D - Music

Go Math - Chapter 1
Go Math
Quizlet

Explorers Research
European Explorers
Gilder Lehrman
Kidport: Explorers
History Channel
Leif Eriksson
Rocks and Minerals Activities
Interactives: The Rock Cycle
Virtual Rock Drawer
Lizzadro Museum 
Glencoe Rock Classification
Kids Geo
Water cycle
 Kid Zone
NASA
Enchanted Learning
Kid's Geo
US Geological Society
The Water Cycle Video
Leif Erikson Day
Mental Floss
Easy Science for Kids
Biography
Famous-explorers
Viking Games
Viking game
Explore a Viking Village
Sailing game
Become a Spice Trader
Pirates Maps and Traps
Native Americans
History Channel
Ducksters
History for Kids
Kid Info
Mr. Nussbaum

Jamestown leadership article
Tour the world
States websites
Sheppard states
Lizard Point
Seterra
Capitals webites
Sheppard capitals
Lizard Point
Seterra
Youtube song
Cheryl's Youtube song

Math Fact Fluency Games
Math Playground
- Multiplication or subtraction
ABCya.com
Math baseball
Earth, Sun and Moon Websites

Memory Game
NASA -name the moon phase
Phases Drag and Drop
What is a solar eclipse?
Lunar eclipse
Solar eclipse video - China 2008
FactMonster eclipse quiz
Study Tips
The 9 Best Scientific Study Habits (youtube video)
* Study in small, short chunks (30 minutes)
* cram sessions actual make you learn less
* rereading notes doesn't help 
* write flash cards
* set one goal for each session 
* think about trying to teach the idea to someone at the end, not take a test
* give yourself a practice test
* have a specific study spot with your study tools
* get rid of all distractions - phone, music, etc
Mr. Setaro's Quizlet Page
Division Games
Puzzle Pics
Division Derby
Math Man
Number Invaders
Pirate Division
High Flying Race Division
Fruit Splat Division
Rocks and Minerals Activities
Interactives: The Rock Cycle
Virtual Rock Drawer
Lizzadro Museum 
Glencoe Rock Classification
Kids Geo
Thirteen Colonies
Land of the Brave
 Social Studies for Kids
Ducksters
Fractions Websites

Simplifying Fractions (Lowest terms)
Finding a common denominator
Adding fractions with unlike denominators
Subtracting fractions with unlike denominators
Rewriting improper fractions
Reaction Time Webites

Math is Fun
Baseball
Just Park
Sheep in a Flock
Reaction Time Research
 
Study Tips
The 9 Best Scientific Study Habits (youtube video)
* Study in small, short chunks (30 minutes)
* cram sessions actual make you learn less
* rereading notes doesn't help 
* write flash cards
* set one goal for each session 
* think about trying to teach the idea to someone at the end, not take a test
* give yourself a practice test
* have a specific study spot with your study tools
* get rid of all distractions - phone, music, etc
North America Geography
Ducksters
Lizard Point
South America Geography
Ducksters
Lizard Point
European geography
Ducksters
Lizard Point

  • November 2017
  • December 2017
    • WedDec06 Special Board of Education Meeting 5:00 PMStillman Building
    • ThuDec14 CW - Winter Concert CW Cafetorium

      Grades 4, 5, & 6 Concert times 9:00 am and 12:00 pm

      Grades K, 1, 2, & 3 Concert times 10:40 am and 1:40 pm

    • TueDec19 CW - Winter Concert - Snow Date CW Cafetorium

      Grades 4, 5, & 6 - Concert times 9:00 am and 12:00 pm

      Grades K, 1, 2, & 3 - Concert times 10:40 am and 1:40 pm

Home of the Owls!

Wethersfield Public Schools

127 Hartford Avenue
Wethersfield, CT 06109
Phone: 860-571-8100

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